Can alcohol cure a headache?

On the other hand, in some groups, alcohol seems to have protective effects against headaches. There has been some research on the effect alcohol has on increasing blood flow to certain parts of the brain, but whether it causes or relieves headache symptoms depends largely on the type of headache.

Can alcohol cure a headache?

On the other hand, in some groups, alcohol seems to have protective effects against headaches. There has been some research on the effect alcohol has on increasing blood flow to certain parts of the brain, but whether it causes or relieves headache symptoms depends largely on the type of headache. While alcohol can trigger tension headaches, it is most commonly associated with migraines and cluster headaches. The results showed that drinking both pints of beer could reduce headache by a quarter more than pain relievers.

Basically, drinking alcohol gives your body a greater tolerance for pain, which makes your headache seem pretty basic. Low-dose alcohol, especially red wine, reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Migraine, specifically with aura or high frequency, increases the risk of some cardiovascular diseases. The non-selective suggestion of alcohol withdrawal for all migraine patients is not correct.

In fact, patients with a high frequency of migraine at increased risk of ischemic stroke may benefit from a low dose of alcohol. Certainly, alcoholic beverages can trigger migraine and tension headache in some subjects. Alcohol has long been associated with the development of headache, and about a third of migraine patients note alcohol as a trigger. Based on this association, population studies show that migraine patients tend to drink alcohol less frequently than people without migraine.

Wine in particular is an alcoholic beverage that has been linked to headaches that date back to ancient times, when Celsius (25 sec, C. Despite this common belief, there is very little scientific evidence to support the belief that wine is a more common trigger for headaches than other forms of alcohol. The effects of alcohol poisoning are relatively predictable based on the measured blood alcohol content. People who drink alcohol regularly, or those who are taking certain specific medications that affect liver enzymes, may metabolize alcohol more quickly and, as a result, have fewer poisoning and hangover problems.

Vasodilation cannot explain late alcohol-induced headache, since the alcoholic hangover symptom appears when alcohol levels drop to zero. More than a third of participants said alcohol had this effect, and about 78% named red wine as the most common trigger for alcohol. People who can't stop drinking should talk to a doctor about treatment for alcohol use disorder, which is a serious but treatable condition. The response to alcohol varies from person to person, and there is no alcohol that doesn't cause a migraine or other headache at all.

Since alcohol can trigger a migraine attack, in a sense, only a small number of people with migraine should drink alcohol.

Kendra Whirry
Kendra Whirry

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